Facebook causes depression: Study

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A new study has proved that excessive uses of Facebook may cause depression, and the more someone uses it, the more depressed he or she becomes. Social networks are a way to share, and the experience of successful sharing comes with a psychological and physiological rush that is often self-reinforcing.

Facebook could even cause problems in relationships, by increasing feelings of jealousy. Facebook had the opposite effect, lowering their feelings of connection and increasing their sense of loneliness. When the subjects were actively engaged with Facebook, their physiological response measured a significant uptick in happiness. When they were passively browsing, however, the positive effect disappeared.

Whenever we have downtime, the Internet is an enticing, quick solution that immediately fills the gap. We get bored, look at Facebook or Twitter, and become more bored. Getting rid of Facebook wouldn’t change the fact that our attention is, more and more frequently, forgetting the path to proper, fulfilling engagement. And in that sense, Facebook isn’t the problem. It’s the symptom.

A study led via researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Bradley University and the University of Missouri Columbia found that heavy Facebook (FB, Tech30) users can experience envy — which can A new study has proved that excessive uses of Facebook may cause depression, and the more someone uses it, the more depressed he or she becomes.

The researchers studied 736 school students and found that if one quietly stalks their friends on Facebook and afterward understand that their life doesn’t measure up to others, they begin to feel bad about themselves.

“If Facebook is used to see how well an acquaintance is doing financially or how glad an old friend is in his relationship — things that cause envy among users — use of the site can lead feelings of depressions,” said Margaret Duffy, professor at the University Of Missouri School Of Journalism.

Facebook users usually share every little thing about their lives — the dinner they had out last night, vacation at exotic locations, any grant/ felicitation they got, their children’s achievements and so on.

The researchers studied 736 school students and found that if one quietly stalks their friends on Facebook and afterward understand that their life doesn’t measure up to others, they begin to feel bad about themselves.

The people who don’t have similar things to share may feel envious or pitiful for not having similar privileges in life, researchers said.

 

 

-Anu Shrestha

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