Money brings disarguments in relationship

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According to the researcher your relationship with money could ruin your chances at having an actual relationship. Romantics claim money can’t buy love.

Couples with extreme financial stress tend to have lower levels of satisfaction in their relationships. Emotionally strained by their financial struggle, some people become more hostile, irritable or uncommunicative toward their spouse. Many couples even point fingers at one another for their financial downfall.

Most couples fight, but financial arguments often have lasting effects on a relationship. Several studies have found a correlation between financial disagreements and divorce, and these arguments also affect relationships in other states as well. 

In the first study men who felt rich were less satisfied with their partners’ physical attractiveness and were more interested in short-term relationships than those who were made to feel that they were poor. However, women who felt wealthy did not make higher demands regarding the men’s physical appearance.

In the second study, all of the wealthy participants found it easier to interact with an attractive member of the opposite sex than those belonging to a financially disadvantaged class.

Likewise, more men than women from both wealthy and poor conditions selected a closer seat to the more attractive people.

“Wealthy men attach more importance to a mate’s physical attractiveness setting higher standards and preferring to engage in short-term mating than those who have less money. However, for committed women, money may lead to less variation in their mating strategies because losing a long-term relationship generally has a higher reproductive cost,” Chan explained.